108 years passed until the Cubs won the World Series in 2016. That’s a long time. More than a lifetime of waiting for most. Years of struggles, crushed hopes, and many transitions all match what each and every one of us go through during day to day living. A few standouts are:

Dealing with disappointment

Everyday something generally doesn’t go right. As many Cubs players and fans had to deal with another losing season, the range of disappointment was paramount and frustrating. Learning to pick yourself up when all bets are off is a skill in itself and takes a lifetime of practice.

Possible results of not dealing with disappointment: Anger and rigid thinking can develop. Depression.

Changing the way you think tip:  

Say to yourself, this won’t last forever! Look at the bigger picture. Live less on the spectrum ends of all or nothing thinking and reach more of a middle ground.

Happiness for others

Some teams are just better than others. Sharing in another person’s joy is so important. Curb your negative and judgmental thoughts about others’ and instead revel in their successes, accomplished goals, and awesome sunglasses they got on sale. Look on the bright side, or at least be able to see another perspective.

Possible results of not sharing in others’ happiness: Resentment and jealousy can take over your mindset.

Changing the way you think tip:

Tell yourself, what an inspiration this person is, I can reach my goals too! Challenge yourself to not compare yourself to others but be inspired instead. More gratitude less spite.

Role model

Looking up to someone can help carve a path for ourselves that we didn’t know existed. Inspiration alone can fuel mindset in a positive direction and create movement. Sports figures are often looked up to for their insane talent and rise to the top. The challenge for us every day folk, is to think on less of an extreme, meaning, find a way to share your strengths and kindness with others on an everyday basis. Be a good person.

Possible result of finding no one to look up to: Remain uninspired and stuck. Think you’re the only top dog around.

Changing the way you think tip:

Ask yourself, how can I take a healthy risk? How can I share my strengths with others? Challenge yourself to learn something from someone else.

Perseverance

Continued effort and hard work are needed in all aspects of life. One foot in front of the other, and repeat.

Possible result of not sticking with something: Give up easily on goals, no follow through, fear of failure.

Changing the way you think tip:

Ask yourself, What’s important to me? Set a plan with small steps to work toward a chosen goal or dream. Do this often.

Tradition and ritual

Popcorn and peanuts at the game? Or a hotdog and nachos? Memories are built upon this stuff, and values are the foundation for character and integrity. Take The 7th inning stretch and the National Anthem, it wouldn’t be the same without these traditional highlights.

Possible results of not engaging in or building traditions: Lack of established values. Loss of identity.

Changing the way you think tip:

Ask yourself, What’s important to me? Try new things, learn about stuff, step out of your comfort zone.

Patience

You have to ask yourself, how does someone stay a Cubs fan after 108 years of unpredictable seasons, let downs, and maddening almost wins? Most certainly a combination of many things, including understanding what is in, and outside of your control.

Possible result of overreacting: Fuming anger, and way too much energy put into trying to control everything.

Changing the way you think tip:

Think about how you can stay present in the moment. Not getting too far ahead of yourself or drifting too far back. Challenge yourself to make the best of the situation.

Community

There’s no better feeling than to cheer on those you love, with people you love. Sharing a common interest with others intensifies a sense of belonging and connecting with others. It can really give you the warm and fuzzies.

Possible results of never getting to know your “neighbors”: You become trapped inside your own bubble.

Changing the way you think tip:

Think to yourself, I am part of something greater, outside of myself. Volunteer, offer compliments, smile, hold the door open for someone.

Sense of humor

Laughter. The best medicine a person can ask for. How else could the Cub’s survive so many “curses.”

Possible results of never cracking a smile: Overthinking. Frequently absorbing everything on a way too personal level. Breathing negativity.

Changing the way you think tip:

Practice not taking everything so seriously. Remind yourself that the world does not revolve around you alone!

Passion

Dedication, devotion, fervor, hurrah, intensity, spirit. Find it! A pro athlete needs all of these qualities to excel and enhance their talent. What’s good for them, is good for us.

Possible results of lacking passion: No dreams. Frequently thinking you’re not capable of being good at anything. Fearful of taking a risk.

Changing the way you think tip:

Start small. Get to know yourself better and take mini steps toward reorganizing and/or organizing your space. Think about what makes you tick!

Hope

Without hope there’s little left. Hold the belief that something can be changed, and work toward that change. The Cubs kept building the team over time and came back every year with new motivation and inspiration.

Possible results of giving up hope: Depression, never making necessary changes, feeling as if the world is against you.

Changing the way you think tip:

Create and establish a personal “empathy bank” to share with others. Building a united front with others will make you stronger. Challenge yourself to become a problem solver and find a solution.

FYI fun fact:

A few pro teams that are still awaiting a championship:

68 long years and running for the Cleveland Indians, The Detroit Tigers 32 years, The Chicago Bears 31 years, The Indiana Pacers 43 years, The Kansas City Chiefs 47 years, The Milwaukee Brewers 48 years, The Minnesota Vikings 56 years.

About the Author
Andrea Picard

Andrea Picard, LCPC, ATR is a therapist at our Edison Park location. Andrea works with adults, families, teens, children, and moms/caregivers. Andrea’s specialties include art therapy, parent + child relationships, anger, addiction, and anxiety. If you’re interested in working with Andrea, send an email today!